Time Management – A Collaborative Piece

Time Management – A Collaborative Piece

Last week, Andrew Wilt and I were working side-by-side. During a break in the daily grind, we decided to discuss time management. Time management seems to be one of those things we all have to deal with, and I had recently swapped tips and tricks with my peers. Since both of us have previously written blog posts about time management, we felt like the ideas were a step in the right direct, but they could benefit from some revision. So, Andrew and I had that discussion.

New Scrum: Working Remotely

New Scrum: Working Remotely

As the world is becoming more dependent on global partners, teams are joining forces with employees from around the world. To keep pace with the rapidly changing industry, companies are utilizing management strategies like Scrum, DevOps, and DevSecOps to increase productivity and communication. This left many remote teams in the dark... until now. Meet the new “distributed scrum team.” 

Eight Strategies To Boost Your Company’s Creativity

Eight Strategies To Boost Your Company’s Creativity

Last week, I wrote about strategies to increase creativity in your workspace by manipulating the environment. This week, I am going to write about creativity and idea creation, switching the focus from your workspace to your peers and company as a whole. These tips are great for managers or for those who want to take a more active role in their careers. Let’s begin.

Scrum – The Pilot

Scrum – The Pilot

I just finished rereading Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time, by Jeff Sutherland. When I finished, I suggested the book to both my son James and my apprentice at Sustainable Evolution, Andrew Wilt. They both LOVED it. Andrew was enthused enough to suggest we start running weekly sprints and daily standups. In the coming weeks, I will write a book review and he will add his thought in a Scrum blog piece. I’m sure we will have follow-up posts as we move forward with this pilot and adopt this approach to working together. Since Andrew lives in one state and me in another, we will have to use technology to close the gaps.

Hack your environment to stimulate creativity and focus

Hack your environment to stimulate creativity and focus

This year, I have been working towards making my workspace a place that promotes creativity and productivity. Little did I know, my environment was having a huge effect on my output. This week, I am going to share some strategies I have implemented in my life that has boosted my focus and creativity, increasing both the quality and quantity of my work. Feel free to adapt these strategies to fit your working preferences, habits, and routines.

Did You Just Drop the F-Bomb?!?!

Did You Just Drop the F-Bomb?!?!

No, not THAT f-bomb, the other one. Fear. Twice in two days I have heard or read something that refers to fear and the description has varied from fear being an effective tool for achieving an outcome, to fear being an oppressive feeling that fuels self-doubt. Indeed, fear is a key driver in many of our actions. I have a fear of heights (or at least of falling from heights), have been fearful of losing my job, and have been afraid to ask someone out on a date. I have used fear (not proud, more an admission) to try and get my way or drive things the way I wanted them to go. The list is pretty endless on both sides and some fears will always be there. However, the fears around my abilities, my value, my competence, and especially about a job are gone. That loss of fear is enabling me to achieve what I didn’t think was possible. Here’s what has changed for me.  

Extra Day Update

Extra Day Update

Near the beginning of 2016, I blogged about this year being a Leap Year. I suggested that with planning, I would be able to leverage that extra day to review the trajectory of my year and do any course correction needed to meet my yearly goals. To do this, I need to know what my goals for the year are and what my plan to get there looks like. The key areas I mentioned in the blog post were day-to-day time management, work back schedule, goal construction, and milestones. I’m reporting back on how I did with those areas and how I did with my extra day.  

Getting Ideas Out of Your Head

Getting Ideas Out of Your Head

Far too often, I sit down to write an email, finish a project, or write up an idea I had earlier in the day only to be met with the blinking cursor of a “trapped” thought. Within seconds, I am hypnotized by the steady rhythm of the flashing caret. Seconds and then minutes pass. And, for some reason, the room always feels darker. I can literally feel time passing. But here’s the worst part: I know the idea is in there, I have it in there somewhere, but I don’t know how to access it.

SOA in the Teen Years

SOA in the Teen Years

Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is now a teen. In the early 2000s, SOA was just becoming the leading-edge discussion point for architects. Now that SOA has passed its awkward, gangly stage and is fully into its informative teen years, maturing nicely. And, just like any teen, SOA is developing its own language and approach. As I speak to people, some get confused with the use of the new terms. 

5 Ways to Avoid Miss Communication

5 Ways to Avoid Miss Communication

A couple days ago, I received a book in the mail from Amazon, but it wasn’t the book I ordered. This mistake could be the product of many factors, but this event got me thinking about communication. Specifically, how valuable is communication? According to an article by Mark W. Sheffert of Manchester Companies, “it is estimated that miscommunication can cost an organization between 25 percent and 40 percent of its annual budget.” That’s how big communication is to you and your company. 

The IASA Architecture Competition – Final Entry… For Now

The IASA Architecture Competition – Final Entry… For Now

As you may (or may not) have read, I am (still) involved in the local (Seattle) chapter of Iasa first ever IT architecture competition. Team Skyscraper presented their architectural description this past Saturday, along with the four other teams and came in 2nd place. 

Hi What's-Your-Name...

Hi What's-Your-Name...

Nearly 150 years after the death of Napoleon the Third, remembering names remains an important skill to grow and maintain. This leaves us with a few questions: First, why is it so important to remember names? Second, why do I (or people I work with) have such a hard time committing names to memory if it is a basic skill everyone should have? And finally, what are some exercises or tools I can use to grow my skill of name learning? 

Is That a Cliff?

Is That a Cliff?

Be daring and just do it! Leap off of that cliff or jump that chasm.

Most of us see change as a scary cliff. It uncomfortable and we shy away from it--especially big change. The most traumatic things you can do in your life are change relationships, move households, and change jobs.  But at times, you really do need to make adjustments. How do you know? 

How to Write a Weekly Blog During Your Coffee Break

How to Write a Weekly Blog During Your Coffee Break

Writing a weekly blog is a worthwhile process--one that is both challenging and rewarding. Despite our best efforts, Andy Ruth and I don't always get around to it every week. The hardest part is finding time. Through the successes and failures, I have come to realize the key is discovering the gaps of downtime between daily tasks and then learning how to utilize those breaks. For example, look for time between meetings and during breaks for coffee or lunch. You can also mentally prepare in the car (or public transit) and when you are getting ready in the morning (in the shower). About 10-15 minutes a day is all you really need, but remember: don’t limit yourself to 15 minutes if you are on a roll.

The IASA Architecture Competition – Entry #4

The IASA Architecture Competition – Entry #4

As you may (or may not) have read, I am (still) involved in the local (Seattle) chapter of Iasa first ever IT architecture competition. Team Skyscraper has delivered their second set of deliverables and are now in the home stretch. With the business requirements and conceptual architecture being the first set of deliverables, this past weekend they had to submit software, infrastructure and security architectures, and the technology stack they chose. 

What Will You Do With Your Extra Day?

What Will You Do With Your Extra Day?

Time is funny. We all have 24 hours in a day and 365 days in a year. Yet most of us complain about how little time we have and how there are too few hours in a day. This year is a Leap Year so we all have an extra day. This is also the start of a new year and many make resolutions, so this year I will make a resolution about time, and my extra day. I resolve to remember I have an extra day and use it to reflect on (and correct) the trajectory of my year. In fact, I will officially declare it as Extra Day - a day to limit work, take a breath and reflect on the direction the year is taking. I’ll do it on February 29th since that is where the calendar places our extra day. But, to do that, I’ll need a plan.

Making Habits Automatic

Making Habits Automatic

Whether you realize it or not, you are in the middle of performing a habit. Somehow, you made your way onto a computer or smartphone and are now browsing the internet. This is to say, we are all performing some activity we do regularly, and these repetitive behaviors are habits. So when we say we are going to make a new habit, what we are really saying is that we are going to replace one habit with a more desirable one. The point of this blog post is to help you become more aware of your habits and offer some pointers as you set your sights on a new goal. Whether you are looking to make a life change or tweak an existing routine, these five steps will help you achieve your workflow goals.

11 Lessons I Learned During my First Year of Blogging

11 Lessons I Learned During my First Year of Blogging

One of my favorite things I get to do at SEI is write weekly blog posts to engage with the public and our community. This was my first year writing in this format and I have learned a lot along the way. One year and 37 posts later (plus 32 posts by SEI mentor, Andy Ruth), 2015 has taught me 11 mandatory lessons every blogger should consider: